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Thread: Advice in brake setup, clutch, and suspension

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    Default Advice in brake setup, clutch, and suspension

    I知 in the process of doing a full teardown to bare shell, doing major rewire work, deleting creature comforts, and selecting weight reduction modifications. The end goal will be removal of somewhere between 1200 and 1300 lbs off my car which was roughly 3800lbs before I started. I知 uncertain as to what the braking system needs to be sized to and how to properly build and balance the system. I understand the type of tires I utilize will play a big role in the overall braking as well as traction which ties back to suspension. I may be doing this ass backwards however since the car is shelled I would like to overhaul the entire braking system, run new lines, install a high capacity res, possibly a fluid heat sink, and etc.

    I purchased an inverted Willwood triple master brake and clutch pedal assembly so I can mount a new setup which makes servicing the engine easier. The current OEM master reservoir, clutch / brake pedal assembly, booster, and brake line routing is beyond terrible and needs to go unless otherwise advised. I would like to improve everything relating to each system within the limits of a respecable budget as well as do something other than OEM.

    The current short list of OEM balanced brake kits available for my vehicle are:

    AP Racing Front Kit (http://www.ipsmotorsports.net/produc...oducts_id=2399 )

    Brembo Grand Tourismo Front Kit (http://www.ipsmotorsports.net/produc...oducts_id=1108 )

    StopTech Front Kit level 2 ( http://www.ipsmotorsports.net/produc...roducts_id=842 )

    StopTech Front Kit Level 3 (http://www.ipsmotorsports.net/produc...oducts_id=5330 )

    K Sport Pro Comp Front Kit (http://www.ipsmotorsports.net/produc...oducts_id=2440 ).


    I understand the brake bias of the car will be completely different from the stock setup and would like to do the footwork in the design now and build it into the car before I put it all back together. I have some questions about selecting a proper proportioning valve and where to place it, installing larger replacement brake lines (whether they池e solid or braided), and how to plan for future setup of the brake bias.

    My car isn稚 a DSM/EVO series (it痴 a 72 series 3000gt VR-4) but I know this is the right place to ask for help and will get straight answers and correct information regardless of how much of an ego blast it may be.

    Regarding the clutch and suspension. The clutch is an adapted Tilton OT-2 and the suspension I'm leaning towards mounting is a custom Bilstein. I will go into the specifics of the suspension and clutch setup when a get some time to elaborate on everything and understand how things work around here. Most of my setup and design has come from collaborating with Hal, Jake Lehmkuhl and Erron Spalsbury. They've been a tremendous aid in helping me with brainstorming but now it's time to get to work.

    Thank you for your help ahead of time.

    Jeremy

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    Is there a question in there?

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    I don't know much about the specific details of the brake kits you listed, but I'd likely sort them in the order you have above. Definitely put AP on the top of the list, then probably Brembo.

    Does the Wilwood pedal assy you bought have a balance bar?
    -Charlie

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    The Wilwood pedal assembly did not come with a balance bar. I have to select the balance bar style and am uncertain as to what system should be utilized. I'm not sure if I'm stating this correctly but one system is a cascading push style, and the other is a follow style? An explanation on the balance bar and setup would be great!

    Regarding the front brake kit setup, each manufacturer states their particular kit has been built for my vehicle. Each kit has a different piston setup as well as rotor design. Some bigger, some smaller, so which one is better? Before I get to far ahead and buy the brakes I need to download a fitment template to ensure I have adequate clearance, and then get some reviews (should the sizing based on the rims I currently own leave me constrained to a specific manufacturer than that's what I'll be left with). Which one should I go with? I would like some advice or reviews from anyone on the board who may have experience utilizing AP Racing, Brembo, StopTech, and the K-Sport BBK's if possible.

    I've never owned a vehicle with performance brakes, just basic OEM 4 pot front calipers with 2 pot rears, improved rotors, decent pads, and upgraded brake lines. A few 100mph scrubs and my brakes are usually done. To me that seems quite distant from what I'd like achieve performance wise. I have no clue as to the difference in good brakes, great brakes, and excellent brakes. I've ridden in a number of cars that had me holding my harness with a death grip thinking the seat was going to come unglued. I'd assume matched with the right tire that's what great brakes feel like and would love that.

    Back to the bias thing, is increasing the brake line diameters and running new lines going to be a performance upgrade? Is there some math or magic equation that needs to be evaluated to approximate its position and the optimum brake line diameters? How about the bore diameter of the master assembly itself? Does the proportioning valve need to be located in the center of the vehicle? Is the bias adjusted by the proportioning valve, balance bar, brake line diameter, or pads or a combination of everything?

    Thanks for your input on the AP Kit CP.

    Jeremy

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    Your also going to be 1200lbs lighter. That will dramatically change your breaking ability. The rotor size is mainly for heat dispensation. I personally would go with the AP brakes if money isn't an object
    Maximuscr31
    1998 Eclipse GSX -Almost ready to run

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    I wouldn't put K-Sport parts on my lawnmower. Period. End of discussion. They started as a ching chang junk house, and they will always remain a ching chang junk house. If you want to take your 8 piston squidly diddly nonsense to a car show, then by all means buy orange garbage. If you want high quality parts, you simply don't buy K-Sport anything.


    As to the rest of the kits, the AP and Brembo kit don't list what calipers they use, so it's difficult to say more than that they make a really excellent product, and it will likely be good no matter what they put in the box. The Stop Tech ST-40 and ST-60 calipers are both exceptionally high quality race level street quality parts. By that I mean that they are stiff and light enough to be race calipers, but use replaceable steel rub points, dust seals, effective anti rattle hardware, etc to be nice street parts. Stop Tech also uses a ton of piston bores to match their piston ares to your needs. I would personally call their tech line, explain your situation and see what they have to say.


    That said, where the heck do you plan to find 1200 lbs to shed? Thats a whole lot of twinky wrappers to find under the back seat...
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    Quote Originally Posted by JFast View Post
    The Wilwood pedal assembly did not come with a balance bar. I have to select the balance bar style and am uncertain as to what system should be utilized. I'm not sure if I'm stating this correctly but one system is a cascading push style, and the other is a follow style? An explanation on the balance bar and setup would be great!
    I did a quick search and did not see any wilwood pedals that are sold without a balance bar. I am not familiar with your description of the two styles, I only see one style available from wilwood.

    I would recommend a balance bar and external adjustment knob so you can dial in your bias at the circuit. Wilwood is not the greatest stuff but it is decent.

    What are you going to do with the car?
    -Charlie

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Spalding View Post
    That said, where the heck do you plan to find 1200 lbs to shed? Thats a whole lot of twinky wrappers to find under the back seat...
    Just started digging... and the, 電on't need that! cricket on my left shoulder kept chirping louder than the on my right chirping, "Yes you do!" Seriously though, I took a pretty no nonsense approach to what I want "on" the car and "in" the car. I will need help piecing that back together and working on the cage too!

    I've taken a lot of parts and pieces off my car to a local fiberglass and molding company called Plasticare. If I want a part made out of CF or fiberglass they give me a price and I say go and turn it back around in about a week. The biggest weight loss came from another local manufacturing company called Plastics. I took them all my glass, a foam custom diffuser template, and my headlamps and they molded my glass with a high density polycarbonate lexan style material that doesn't shatter. They even tinted everything except the headlamps for me. They charged me $100 per window and $25 ea for the lamp covers.

    Quote Originally Posted by CPMaverick View Post
    I did a quick search and did not see any wilwood pedals that are sold without a balance bar. I am not familiar with your description of the two styles, I only see one style available from wilwood.

    I would recommend a balance bar and external adjustment knob so you can dial in your bias at the circuit. Wilwood is not the greatest stuff but it is decent.

    What are you going to do with the car?
    The pedal assembly I purchased is similar to this one: http://static.speedwaymotors.com/RS/...403342~1_L.jpg

    The balance bar options for the assembly I purchased are:

    http://www.wilwood.com/Images/PEDALS...40-1757-lg.jpg

    http://www.wilwood.com/Images/PEDALS...40-4745-lg.jpg

    No racing plans for the vehicle at the moment although hill climb and time attack have crossed my mind several times. Just a light personalized streetcar for now I suppose.

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    Those balance bars are identical. One just includes a steel sleeve so you can fabricate your own pedal assembly.

    If you aren't going to race the car, then you are way overkill on the braking system though.
    -Charlie

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    Good pads and some larger rotors at your projected weight would be more than sufficient. Get some brackets mmade for cobra rotors or get tod @tce to make you some bigger two piece rotors and make your own brackets.
    Maximuscr31
    1998 Eclipse GSX -Almost ready to run

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    Don't buy the Ksports. They're garbage. Other than that AP's work well. Look into what Erron runs on his 3s. They work to slow his beast down

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFast View Post
    is increasing the brake line diameters and running new lines going to be a performance upgrade? Is there some math or magic equation that needs to be evaluated to approximate its position and the optimum brake line diameters? How about the bore diameter of the master assembly itself? Does the proportioning valve need to be located in the center of the vehicle? Is the bias adjusted by the proportioning valve, balance bar, brake line diameter, or pads or a combination of everything?
    Pi*r^2 will help you with a lot of the information you're looking for on the brake line sizing, master cylinder bore size and piston size. Don't forget pedal ratio either. The pressure from your master cylinder can be calculated using the pressure you apply to your brake pedal, the pedal ratio and the area of your master cylinder - the result will be how many psi your master cylinder is actually exerting. Since you can't really compress liquid, that will translate on the other end to your caliper's pistons, where you'll need to account for the overall area of your pistons that you're applying force to in order to determine the effective braking force. Most calipers will have a rating somewhere in their data sheets. Of course, the fluid in the system needs to move around, and the larger the diameter of the lines, the more pedal pushing you'll have to do in order to generate the pressure you need.

    I may be wrong on this part, but I've always been under the assumption that you want the smallest lines you can get away with using, which will give you a firmer pedal feel and higher pressures more easily - the problem is going too high on the pressure and not having the appropriate volume. I have no problem getting to 1450psi on my rear brakes on my car without bottoming out the brake pedal; my calipers are rated for 1600psi. My setup is backwards from the norm - big rear tires.

    Anyway, a prop valve doesn't need to be in the center of the car - it will most likely be on the rear brake line for most vehicles and will reduce pressure to just those calipers. It can be located up by the master cylinder.
    Scott Glassbrook
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    So doing a little more research as time has afforded I discovered a Siemens Product called "wedge brakes". Apparently from testing the outcome is good. From the PDF's posted on the Siemens R&D archive I discovered the wedge system to consistently have a 20% shorter braking distance.

    The inns and out's of the system in a general summary... The braking system is electronic. No hydraulics, no master, no slave, and no more hydraulic lines. Only thing that remains from traditional disc brake systems are rotors. The calipers are electronic and managed with a 12v drive box. Sounds as though the drive box is similar to an Arduino Micro Controller of sorts so the down side is if you should lose power, then what? http://paultan.org/2007/03/15/siemen...dge-brake-ewb/

    Picture from Siemens Corp: http://www.siemens.com/press/pool/de...pi_1434290.jpg

    Mod Edit: Link to pictures do not post them directly. <MR>

    Apparently the setup is currently being tested under the Audi platform in Europe. I can't seem to find much information on the system as it seems to be pretty hush hush. I really like the idea and thought it was an interesting concept.

    In the mean time I'm going to wait to move on this until I can get more information on some of the newer options and make up my mind when the time comes.

    I really don't like the routing on my brake lines so either ditching them entirely or just moving them anywhere but where they are right now is a great idea. You can obviously see how much heat is being transferred into the brake system from the burn pattern on the firewall shield just to the right of the main balance valve. Additionally, the main brake supply lines to the ABS controller pass right thru the hotspot. The spot is right above the rear manifold.
    Last edited by MikeRizz; 2011-04-04 at 14:00:34.

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    Picture of OEM line routing and rear hotspot. A likely spot to cause brake fluid boiling causing bubbles and brake fade in the future: http://i788.photobucket.com/albums/y...1911_004-1.jpg
    Last edited by MikeRizz; 2011-04-04 at 14:00:54.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JFast View Post
    Apparently the setup is currently being tested under the Audi platform in Europe. I can't seem to find much information on the system as it seems to be pretty hush hush. I really like the idea and thought it was an interesting concept.

    In the mean time I'm going to wait to move on this until I can get more information on some of the newer options and make up my mind when the time comes.
    You are not seriously considering this for your car, right?

    Also, embedding images is not kosher here, especially not large ones. Please link instead.
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    Now you know why I went to a single turbo setup. The heat from the rear turbo is just too much for such a confined space. (and I tried a host of solutions) The final straw for me was when I started to smell something inside the car burning. Touching the firewall with my hand and found it to be paint that was flaking away.
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    Quote Originally Posted by CPMaverick View Post
    You are not seriously considering this for your car, right?
    No way, I thought it was an interesting concept though. It's a little complex for my application and most certainly beyond the limits of my budget.

    Quote Originally Posted by Erron Spalsbury View Post
    Now you know why I went to a single turbo setup. The heat from the rear turbo is just too much for such a confined space. (and I tried a host of solutions) The final straw for me was when I started to smell something inside the car burning. Touching the firewall with my hand and found it to be paint that was flaking away.
    Were you utilizing any heat shields at the time? This is from running an unwrapped cast iron rear header. Was there any noticeable brake fluid fade? So one of the other compelling arguements for switching over to the single was heat on the firewall? I know you're still fighting the thermal battle Erron. I plan on getting air moving in there with some ducting and good aero design. I do however need to move the brakelines. I'll post up my findings on the actual brake line routing, lengths vs. number of bends, it's actually quite surprising.

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    Yes. Ceramic turbine housing coated as well as the manifold and o2 housing. Then wrapped 3 layers deep in exhaust wrap with the stock heat shields shoe horned over all of it. It was still too hot. I also had the brake lines wrapped with header wrap and still had issues.

    The heat issues now are completely different than the battle back then. It was radiant heat then and water temp now. I didn't make enough power back then to have overheating issues. Back then when we did our dyno session with Hal and a few others at Autosport Werks, the car put down 440 corrected. Nothing compared to what it does today.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Erron Spalsbury View Post
    I also had the brake lines wrapped with header wrap and still had issues.
    Ugh, don't wrap your brake lines with header wrap. You need something to reflect or shield the heat. Header wrap may insulate but it will keep heat in once it gets there. Bad.
    -Charlie

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    Charle, that was what I was trying to do, keep the heat from ever getting into the lines. The heat from the rear turbo section was hot enough to blister the paint on the firewall. Not having them shielded by *something* they were exposed to direct radiant heat. The lines themselves under the wrap has the cool NASA gold reflection material on them. It still works to this day although the turbo is no longer back there.
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    I dug into the JDM Advanced Technical Information Manual seeking an explanation on reasons for compromise and stumbled on the most laughable diagram. ( http://i788.photobucket.com/albums/y...rakesystem.gif ) Let me tell you guys... The brake system on my car looks nothing like the one depicted. Nope, not even with glasses on. The diagram shows this aesthetically uniform and centralized brake system with proportional brake line lengths and etc.

    So I spent roughly two hours with a 1/16" micro fish tape to take exact measurements on the brake line lengths, to count the number of bends, and to draw a composite sketch to try and decide what might be the most beneficial place to relocate the proportioning valve. Turns out, I don't think it's set in an "ideal" position. I think I can do better. After actually tracing every line down this is what I came up with.


    Brake Line Location / Line Length / 45ー / 90ー / 180ー (bend styles)

    Front Drivers Side = 13' / 12 / 12 / 1

    Front Passenger Side = 6'6" / 8 / 12 / 1

    Rear Drivers Side = 14'4" / 6 / 7 / 0

    Rear Passenger Side = 11" / 6 / 10 / 2


    I'm going to take some brake line pressure readings to see if my hunch of the lines having unequal pressure possibly due to a non proportionate number of bends, unequal line lengths, and a number of brake line bottlenecks. I called a friend who works for Viking Pressure Systems that has access to hydro cad and am going to have them draw something up for me. I am going to stick with the same size brake line.

    So, the brake lines are coming out (100% sure) as well as the proportioning valve. The plan is to equalize the system line pressure and to remove the main brake distribution system from traveling thru the manifold heat concentration areas on the firewall which will hopefully be a measureable improvement as compared with the current setup.

    CP can you or someone help me understand a few conceptual ideas regarding proportional valve operation and selection. How exactly does the valve itself work? Is there a balance spring that gets compressed to a ball valve that opens when a certain force is applied to it?

    Apparently there may be four to six options of Mitsubishi proportioning valves that can be adapted. There are three which have been designed for the AWD turbo model 3000gt and the last would be utilizing one from several variations of DSM designs.

    From what I could gather while researching, the split points and the redistributed rear output brake pressure for 3000gt proportioning valve selections are:

    (1) Japan (JDM) Model, AWDTT = 390psi Rear brake pressure drops roughly 25% when cracked open

    (2) USA Spec Model, AWDTT = 530psi Rear brake pressure drops roughly 40% when cracked open

    (3) Spider Model, AWDTT = 700psi Rear brake pressure drops roughly 30% when cracked open

    Does anyone have the data for the DSM years/versions of proportioning valves?

    Most importantly, should I retain the stock rear brake piston calipers and rotors which one do I utilize?

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    I don't understand why you are worried about line lengths and bends. This is an (approximately) incompressible fluid hydraulic system with very little fluid movement. It is not going to be sensitive to either.
    -Charlie

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    Try adding 20 feet of coiled brake line to one corner of the car. There won't be a pressure difference compared to the other side. There may be a slight drop due to friction but im sure you would need a date logger with a high sampling rate to even notice it.

    I have the same willwood pedal assembly you linked to earlier, once you get the proper sized master cylinders and the balance bar set right you won't have to mess around with proportioning valves or oem distribution blocks. You also don't have to stick with brake kits that supposedly have the proper size pistons to work with the stock master. Its easier to mess things up if you piece it together yourself but its an option.
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    I'm revisiting the project now that I have some free time to jump back into working on the car. I just finished doing a large portion of wiring and accesory deletes and am considering removing the ABS unit. Is there a reason why I should keep it? How important is it? Sonce owning the car, nearly five years, I don't recall ever actually engaged the ABS sytem on any driving surface. In saying that I can't say why there's a reason to keep it but will heed any advice from you guys on wether it should stay or go. ABS, should I keep it, why? If I remove it is there any extra work involved when I remove the ABS ring gears off the axles?

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    I would say keep it. The only time it will ever engage is when it senses a tire locking up. If you haven't seen it work in your car it's probably because your tire adhesion was greater than the braking capability. It won't make one bit of difference on braking until you lock up a tire. Then it's a matter of whether or not you want to flat spot a tire and shoot off in some obscure direction, or have the abs engage, save the tires and have a wee bit of control still. I'd really encourage you to leave it for now and take the car to the track. You can always pull the fuse to see what it's like without it. A rolling tire, even while pulsing, will still allow you to have some directional control. A locked up tire and you go in the direction of the mass behind it.
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    Aero and tires play a big role in how hard you can brake and how easy you can lock up a wheel. Having said that, I would suggest keeping the ABS for now. When you reach a point with the car that you have enough aero loading that you can stand on the pedal and not lock it then you can feel free to ditch it.

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    We got the NSX with aero load approaching LMP1 and we brake past the 0 marker sometimes the driver just slams the shit out of the pedal with all the force he can and then backs off like crazy as the car sheds speed. The biggest problem in high speed brake zones is human reaction time to shed that kind of pedal forces that quickly.
    Last edited by Andrew Brilliant; 2011-06-12 at 22:59:24.
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    What tires are you running that can handle the aero load?
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    Yoko slicks meant for the GT cars, we have to pressure them up and limit top speed or trim out where we will go faster. I decide that based on the sim data. Also I meant the 1 marker
    Last edited by Andrew Brilliant; 2011-06-13 at 00:16:59.
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    Did you guys use anything to assist the driver with that in LMP? I was reading a while back about some systems they were using in F1 to shift the brake balance as the aero load came off.
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    It depends on your COP if you need migrating bias or not. We didn't need it on the LMP. Where is your COP?
    -Charlie

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    percent of forces at the axle work for you? 58.37% rear, I have been working on moving it further back.
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    Andrew or CP, what do LMP1 and COP mean?

    DG, Thanks for the snippit and tip!

    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Lehmkuhl View Post
    Aero and tires play a big role in how hard you can brake and how easy you can lock up a wheel. Having said that, I would suggest keeping the ABS for now. When you reach a point with the car that you have enough aero loading that you can stand on the pedal and not lock it then you can feel free to ditch it.
    I have increased the frontal and rear wing aero surfaces quite a bit Jake. It will be an interesting test on how it impacts my braking. After you and Erron pimped me ear to ear this weekend at the track I bee keepin the ABS for now. Final decision, separate the wiring and modify the harness fore simple disconnect and removal later.

    Next couple of questions guys,

    What are your thoughts on relocating one or any of the brake, clutch, and power steering fluid reservoirs inside of the firewall? Is that a bad idea?

    Is the front bumper area a bad place to mount heat sinks for those systems?

    I pulled the FMIC and am going with two huge sidemounts and would prefer not having to obstruct them. Any reccomendations on cores or styles of coolers to utilize for each system and where you guys have mounted them?

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    LMP1 = Le Mans Prototype 1, a classification for the fastest prototype cars. COP is center of pressure, the balance point for aerodynamic forces.
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    Where are the brake and power steering reservoirs generally located in the LMP's? Do they also utilize some sort of heat sink? What are the reservoirs composed of? All fittings and lines in the engine are solid round tube or braided steel?

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    Jer, the brake reservoir on a race car is normally located where it fits and can accessed. Some use brake fluid cooling some do not. Braided steel isn't used as much any longer, braided kevlar/nomex seems to be taking the place of it. Just as good, and much lighter. Also it won't abrade anything that it rubs. Most cooling systems for brake fluid are fairly costly so I wouldn't look at the for right now. It involves using your engine coolant to cool it. As for power steering there are generally two camps of theory for cooling it. The first is to use a smaller reservoir and a cooler. The other is to run no cooler and a huge reservoir allowing for the fluid itself to disperse heat. It's really going to depend on your car. I don't think Erron has any issues in his PS cooling perhaps you should ask him what he is doing.

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    braided kevlar/nomex seems to be taking the place of it.
    Hell yeah, that stuff is the shiznit.

    Having been victim to braided stainless sawing its way into something it shouldn't, the braided Kevlar is the way to go.

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    I have never seen any kind of 'brake fluid cooling' on any racecar I've ever worked on. I have only seen cooling the brake discs and calipers themselves.

    I wouldn't even know how this works. Brake fluid doesn't move considerably, so how do you cool it in any effective way except at the source of the heat by cooling the brake package?
    Last edited by CPMaverick; 2011-06-15 at 14:07:55.
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    Charlie they have a recirculator on vehicles that don't have much of an option for brake packaging (aka NASCAR). It recirc's the fluid and passes it through what is akin to a fluid/fluid cooler. They work somewhat ok, but can be costly to fit recirc tubes and cooling pieces in.

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    In the early 2000s there were a few cars in SuperGT that had water cooled brakes. There were coolant passages in the calipers.
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    If I recall it just created extra headache for not much cooling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew Brilliant View Post
    In the early 2000s there were a few cars in SuperGT that had water cooled brakes. There were coolant passages in the calipers.
    Might as well put fins on the calipers at that point.

    Are there really issues with boiling if good fluid is used?
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    Depends on the length of the race, the condition of the seals, the track, the weight of the car, the size of the rotors, the pad compound. There are so many variables in there it's not even funny. As far as fins on the calipers, it's not always the easiest thing getting cool air into there and directed at the caliper. Some cars it's down right impossible. Race cars are developed with brake cooling in mind so it's a completely different beast. In the end I think what would be useful here is a targeted discussion towards closed wheel braking issues, solutions, and shortfalls.

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    In any case, there is no reason to ever run brake fluid recirculators or water cooled calipers on a car that isn't severely rules-constrained. The best way is to size brakes adequately and directly cool the caliper and rotor with air.
    -Charlie

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevan Bates View Post
    Might as well put fins on the calipers at that point.

    Are there really issues with boiling if good fluid is used?
    In that case the issue was heavy cars, a lot of power, aero that was in its infancy and rules that contained brake sizing. Yah they would boil. Going through 3 heat exchanges is way less efficient.
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    Alright, so I'm done with the build. Cranked car, took it for a ride etc. Well after a spirited drive yesterday after about 1/2 hour of driving I started dragging my right front. Then after 10 miles or so it transferred to the left front. Why aren't my brakes dis-engaging? I didn't change anything in the system. The only thing I did was bleed the brakes. Is there an electroninc brake sensor or some sort of pedal height adjustment that I need to adjust that tells the brakes to stop clamping? This is really concerning and frustrating because it almost seems like I'm going to eventually get a full lockup. Master is good, proportioning valve is good, no lines are kinked or removed, brake pads and rotors are the ones installed. Only thing I did was reinstall them and bleed the brakes without turning the car on. Help me out guys!!!

    Jeremy

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    EDIT..."brake pads and rotors are the ones previously installed.

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    WTF is with these brakes? They're clamping tighter and tighter the more I use them?

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    and even if I'm not using them... they're clamping and I'm not depressing the damn pedal!

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